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Blepharitis

Blepharitis is inflammation of the eyelids. Commonly blepharitis occurs when tiny oil glands located near the base of the eyelashes malfunction. It is usually characterized by excess oil production in the meibomian glands near the eyelid, which creates a favorable environment for bacterial growth.It usually causes burning, itching and irritation of the lids. It's a common disorder and may be associated with a low-grade bacterial infection or a generalized skin condition. The inflammation results in scaly and crusty eyelids and the eyes may also feel tired and gritty or become uncomfortable in sunlight or smoky atmospheres. The two most common causes are bacteria and scalp dandruff. Some of these glands are located at the base of the lashes and produce oils that float over the tear film, preventing it from evaporating. Blepharitis can begin in early childhood, producing "granulated eyelids" and continuing throughout life as a chronic condition, or it can develop later in life. Blepharitis is usually a chronic problem that can be controlled with extra attention to lid hygiene. Blepharitis is often a chronic condition that is difficult to treat. Although it's uncomfortable and may be unattractive, blepharitis doesn't cause permanent damage to eyesight.

One of the most common eye problems in older adults is a skin condition called blepharitis . In severe cases, it may also cause styes , irritation and inflammation of the cornea (keratitis) and conjunctiva.   Inflammation happens when the body tries to fight an injury or infection and the specific area tends to look swollen and sore. Some patients have no symptoms at all. Blepharitis usually affects both eyes on the edge of the eyelids and although rarely serious, it can be an uncomfortable, persistent and irritating problem. Blepharitis tends to recur and stubbornly resist treatment. It is inconvenient and unattractive but usually does not damage the cornea or result in loss of vision. Diagnosis is usually based on the symptoms and the appearance of the eyelids. A doctor may use a slit lamp to examine the eyelids more closely. Occasionally, a sample of pus is taken from the edges of the eyelids and is cultured to identify the type of bacteria responsible and the antibiotics to which they are susceptible. Occasionally, a doctor may prescribe an antibiotic ointment, such as bacitracin plus polymyxin B or sulfacetamide or an oral antibiotic, such as doxycycline.

Causes of Blepharitis

The common Causes of Blepharitis :

  • Inflammatory or allergic blepharitis results in increased shedding of skin cells near your eyelids.
  • Bacteria, such as staphylococci, or other organisms
  • Dust, smoke, or other substances that cause allergies.
  • Askin condition called rosacea
  • The ulcerative form (infectious) often results in infectious discharge.

Symptoms of Blepharitis

Some Symptoms of Blepharitis :

  • Sandy, itchy eyes
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Red and/or swollen eyelids
  • Crusty, flaky skin on the eyelids
  • Loss of eyelashes
  • Frothy tears
  • Dandruff
  • Watery or red eyes
  • Itchy eyelids
  • Crusted eyelashes upon awakening
  • Flaking of the skin around the eyes

Treatment of Blepharitis

  • antibiotic ointment does not make the blepharitis clear faster, but it may help to stop the spread of the infection to other parts of the eyes, or treat a secondary infection
  • Moisten a washcloth with warm water and hold it over both eyes for several minutes. This helps to soften any deposits on the eyelids. This can also help open up the tear glands and moisturize the eye.
  • Instructing your child not to rub his/her eyes
  • Severe cases of blepharitis may need to be managed by an ophthalmologist (eye care specialist).
  • Add a few drops of baby shampoo to a cup of water. Moisten a cotton swab with this mixture. Using the swab, clean all the deposits from your lid margins and eyelashes. Do not pull the crusts off with your fingers. Use a new swab for each eye.
  • corticosteroid cream or lotion
  • It is important to know that the goal of the treatment is to decrease the severity of the symptoms.
  • applying warm, wet, compresses to your child's eyes for a period of approximately 15 minutes several times throughout the day
  • Having your child wash his/her hands frequently .

 


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