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Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral palsy" is a general term that describes a group of disorders that appear during the first few years of life and affect a child's ability to coordinate body movements. Palsy means weakness or problems with using the muscles. It is caused by abnormalities inside the brain that disrupt the brain's ability to control movement and posture. Moderate CP may mean the child walks with a limp. More severe CP can affect all parts of a child's physical abilities. The early signs of cerebral palsy usually appear before a child reaches 3 years of age.  The damage can occur during fetal development, during the birth process or during the first few months after birth. A child with moderate or severe CP may have to use a wheelchair and other special equipment. Sometimes children with CP can also have learning problems, with hearing or seeing (called sensory problems ), or mental retardation. Usually, the greater the injury to the brain, the more severe the CP. In some cases, neurological disorders such as mental retardation or seizures also occur in children with cerebral palsy. Cerebral palsy isn't curable. However, getting the right therapy for your child can make a big difference. Today, children with cerebral palsy benefit from a wide range of treatment options and innovations.

Cerebral palsy also known as CP is a condition caused by injury to the parts of the brain that control our ability to use our muscles and bodies. Although the cause of cerebral palsy is not known for certain, there is evidence that links it to both the health history of the mother and child, and accidents causing brain damage. About 500,000 children and adults of all ages in the United States have the condition. Other vital functions that also involve motor skills and muscles such as breathing, bladder and bowel control, eating, and learning are also affected when a child has CP. Some people with cerebral palsy also have other medical disorders, including mental retardation, seizures, impaired vision or hearing, and abnormal physical sensations or perceptions. There is no cure for cerebral palsy, but supportive treatments, medications, and surgery can help many individuals improve their motor skills and ability to communicate with the world.   

Causes of Cerebral Palsy

The common Causes of Cerebral Palsy :

  • Head injuries
  • Infection during pregnancy
  • Low birth weight
  • Brain infections
  • Genetic disorder
  • Drug use during pregnancy
  • Being exposed to radiation
  • Baby's blood is not the same as his mother's blood
  • Lack of oxygen

Symptoms of Cerebral Palsy

Some Symptoms of Cerebral Palsy :

  • Joint contractures that slowly get worse
  • Speech problems ( dysarthria )
  • Muscle contractions
  • Irregular breathing
  • Seizures
  • Hearing problems
  • Spasticity
  • Mental retardation

Treatment of Cerebral Palsy

  • Which helps the child develop fine motor skills such as dressing, feeding, writing, and other daily living tasks.
  • These may include muscle relaxants to ease muscle spasticity and anticonvulsants to reduce seizures. Injections of botulinum toxin (Botox) directly into spastic muscles also may be helpful.
  • Which helps the child develop stronger muscles such as those in the legs and trunk. Through PT, the child works on skills such as walking, sitting, and keeping his or her balance.
  • Using braces or a wheelchair may help the child move.
  • Depending on how severely your child's eyes are affected, he or she may need eyeglasses or surgery to correct a condition, such as cross-eye or other inability of the eyes to focus together properly (strabismus). Hearing aids may help correct any hearing problems.
  • The team will work together to help your child be as independent as possible. They will help him learn as much as he can, move as best he can, and communicate as best he can.
  • Which helps the child develop his or her communication skills. The child may work in particular on speaking, which may be difficult due to problems with muscle tone of the tongue and throat.
  • No single drug controls all types of seizures, and no two patients respond identically to any given drug. Medications are divided into first-generation anticonvulsants (older medications) and second-generation anticonvulsants (more recently developed).

 


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